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Monday, September 16, 2013

DIY Bird Feeder

By Diane Hoffmaster

            

My children’s favorite treats during the summer are ice and yogurt pops. As a result, we end up with an awful lot of wooden sticks by the time September rolls around. In an effort to reuse as much as possible, I give the sticks a good rinse and store them in my art bag for future crafts. One project that caught my eye this month was this easy, DIY wooden bird feeder. Bird watching is a favorite hobby at my house and a great learning experience for kids to help identify bird species. If you too have a stockpile of wooden sticks, follow the simple instructions below to make your own bird feeder.

bird feederMaterials

50 wooden sticks
Newspaper
Glue gun
4-inch wooden dowel
4 long pieces of twine to hang the bird feeder
1-2 cups bird seed

Instructions

1.    Use a piece of newspaper to cover your work space to help protect your furniture and ease the clean-up. To make the base of the bird feeder, line 10-12 wooden sticks next to each other.

2.    Glue 3 wooden sticks perpendicular (about 1-inch apart) to the sticks you’ve lined up on the newspaper and let dry. This will help hold the base of the feeder together.

3.    Flip over the wooden base. Start gluing wooden sticks around the perimeter of the base, overlapping the ends of the sticks.

4.    Continue gluing the wooden sticks around the perimeter of the birdfeeder until it reaches your desired depth, or about 2-to-3-inches deep. Let glue dry.

5.    Take a 4-inch, wooden dowel and glue it to the base of the bird feeder, allowing a couple of inches to stick out the side for the birds to perch on.

6.    Along the perimeter of the feeder, thread a piece of twine under all four corners the wooden sticks and tie tightly. Combine the 4 loose ends of twine at the top of the feeder and loop into one knot.

7.    Hang the bird feeder on a tree in your backyard, fill it with seeds and watch the birds flock!

What creative crafts have you made using wooden sticks?

Photo courtesy of Diane Hoffmaster.

1 Comment so far

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On Friday, May 30, 2014, Mindy from Edmonton wrote

We did this craft & as soon as it rained the whole thing fell apart & was leaking glue into the bird seed. Not a practical.

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